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Lips Against Lead

A NATIONAL EFFORT TO BAN LEAD IN LIPSTICK

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 Teens Turning Green has a plan to effectively help get lead in lipstick banned through policy change in the state of California. In August, 2008, a piece of legislation at the state level to ban lead in lipstick lost by one vote in the California Assembly.  TTG campaign members want that bill to be introduced and are working to ensure its passage, as such a law would have national implications. TTG is engaging youth and adults in California and across the country in helping to make this happen.

THE PROJECT

Teens Turning Green campaign members created a unique and very visible petition to launch this project on October 6, 2008 across the country. Screened onto organic canvas is a proclamation supporting a ban of lead in lipstick. Around that text, we are asking that each supporter not only put their signature on the canvas, but that they also plant a kiss next to it using lead free lipstick signifying their support.

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PETITION CONTENT

TTG created this visual petition as part of our efforts to BAN LEAD IN LIPSTICK.  In 2007, the National Campaign for Safe Cosmetics released a study that found lipsticks from many top brands contained lead. Two thirds of the 33 samples tested contained detectable levels of lead; of those, half were above the lead limit for candy. Exposure to lead can cause brain damage, learning, language and behavioral problems and has also been linked to miscarriages, reduced fertility, hormonal changes and delays in the onset of puberty. Lipstick that contains lead applied several times a day, every day is toxic! Every pair of lips that kisses this petition will wear lead free lipstick because LIPSTICK SHOULD NOT CONTAIN LEAD.  Each kiss represents an individual supporting legislation to BAN LEAD IN LIPSTICK permanently. We should not have to choose beauty over health.

WATCH THE LIPS AGAINST LEAD VIDEO 

SIGN OUR ONLINE PETITION

HOW TO GET STARTED

Ask us to send you a Lips Against Lead Starters Kit it get the momentum started in your school and community. The kit will contain all of the items necessary to set up a table to engage signers. Download our instruction manual to see how you can help gather “kisses.”

FACTS: WHY BAN LEAD IN LIPSTICK?

  • The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics in 2007 found lipsticks from top brands contain lead. Two-thirds of the 33 samples tested contained detectable levels of lead; of those, half were above the lead limit for lead in candy
  • Lead is a potent neurotoxin and linked to numerous other health and reproductive problems
  • Lipstick, like candy, is ingested directly. Nevertheless, the FDA has not set a limit for lead in lipstick – which fits with the disturbing absence of FDA regulatory oversight and enforcement capacity for the $50 billion personal care products industry.
  • Exposure to lead can cause learning, language and behavioral problems such as lowered IQ, impulsiveness, reduced school performance, increased aggression, seizures and brain damage, anemia, and, after long exposure, damage to the kidneys. Lead has also been linked to miscarriage, reduced fertility in men and women, hormonal changes, menstrual irregularities and delays in the onset of puberty in girls.
  • Pregnant women and young children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure because lead easily crosses the placenta and may enter the fetal brain, where it interferes with normal development. Lead has also been linked to miscarriage, reduced fertility in both men and women, hormonal changes, menstrual irregularities and delays in the onset of puberty
  • Lead builds up in the body over time and lead containing lipstick applied several times a day, every day, combined with lead in water and other sources, could add up to significant exposure levels

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

- Download “A Poison Kiss, The Problem of Lead in Lipstick” produced by the National Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, October, 2007
- Read New York Times Article: A Simple Smooch or a Toxic Smak? from May 2009